Kylee Black fears that the End of Life Choice Bill will lead to people  like herself being pressured to consider assisted dying.

Kylee Black fears that the End of Life Choice Bill will lead to people like herself being pressured to consider assisted dying.

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NZ Herald: Hamilton woman with terminal condition explains why she opposes euthanasia bill

"There is literally a piece of my DNA that is missing, so there's no cure." Kylee Black has a connective tissue disorder called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome which is terminal, yet, she is opposed to the End of Life Choice Bill.

Her joints dislocated often with the medical condition affecting her joints, ligaments, tendons, skin, blood vessels and internal organs.

Because her joints don't work as they should, Black relies heavily on other people to help her maintain a fulfilling life.

Along with regular human assistance, she relies on a number of medications and has received many surgeries to keep her body functioning.

The 32-year-old is opposed to the End of Life Choice Bill because she feels people like herself would be pressured to consider assisted dying.

"I have difficult days and those days I don't need to be confronted with easily accessible death," she said.

Kylee Black made a submission on the Euthanasia Bill from the perspective of a disabled young person last year. Photo / Alan Gibson

Kylee Black made a submission on the Euthanasia Bill from the perspective of a disabled young person last year. Photo / Alan Gibson

Watch Kylee’s documentary in widescreen and read her complete story here.

"If assisted suicide is legal it would be legal to promote it. I don't want to be triggered by assisted suicide ads or flyers.

"I have multiple specialists and go to hospital many times a year. I know my care costs a lot of money. But I also know I contribute to society."

Black has revealed all in a mini-documentary created by the movement called #DefendNZ which opposes the End of Life Choice Bill.

Entitled, Choice is a relative term, the mini-documentary is the first full-length film of the movement and launches today.

Alongside Black, there are also commentaries from Hon Dame Tariana Turia DNZM, Dr Huhana Hickey MNZM and Dr Conrad Engelbrecht.

Black fears creating access to euthanasia would affect disabled and elderly people in the short-to-medium which would impact the whole community.

"New Zealand has one of the highest youth suicide rates in the OECD, which occurs in conjunction with high rates of mental illness," she said.

"But while we are actively fighting against suicide, all of a sudden we seem to be saying, 'It's not okay to commit suicide – but you can end your life if you have a serious medical condition'."



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